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Healthy new year!

They say that it's not what you eat between Christmas and New year that's important, but rather what you eat between New year and Christmas!! Here is a healthy sweet treat I have just made for my New year's eve guests tonight - Chocolate orange balls! Wishing you all a happy and healthy 2018! Ingredients: 175 g dates 2 tbsp cacao powder 4 tbsp coconut or olive oil 1 tbsp orange blossom water 6 tbsp ground almonds 2 tbsp chia seeds 60g desiccated coconut In a food processor, blend together the dates, cacao, oil and orange blossom. Then add ground almonds and chia seeds, and pulse until combined. Roll the mixture into small balls, and roll in desiccated coconut. Place them in the fridge for 2

"But I eat a good diet already!"

Many of us lack the basic raw materials (from food and drink) to function at our best. Intensive farming, pollution, stress, stimulants and an over-reliance on processed foods are just some of the reasons for us being deficient in vital nutrients. As a result, we may start to feel sluggish, get energy slumps, headaches, cravings or poor digestion. If this is you, learning how to eat well can be vitally important knowledge. Some scientists believe that long-term, sub-optimal nutrition is a key factor in today’s epidemic of chronic disease. Nutritional therapy is not only about the basics of healthy eating. Foods that are good for one person might not necessarily be good for another. Many of u

Bone appétit!

Bones are the framework on which our body supports itself – strong bones are important for good health and good nutrition is important for strong bones. Building strong bones can help protect us from conditions such as osteoporosis later in life. The nutrients which are particularly important for bones are calcium, vitamin D, vitamin K, magnesium and boron. Calcium gives our bones strength and can be found in dairy foods as well as tinned sardines (with the bones) and green leafy vegetables. The other micronutrients mentioned help to direct calcium to our bones, rather than to soft tissues such as arteries and kidneys, where calcium build-up can cause problems. Vitamins D and K help our bone

"Mum, I'm staaaarving!!!"

If your kids are anything like mine, then they are always ravenous when they get in from school. They just want to eat anything that’s in sight – so how do you keep them happy without filling their bellies with junk? Here are some healthy snacks to keep your kids satisfied until dinner time: Oat cakes spread with peanut butter, humus or cream cheese A bowl of tomato and lentil soup – takes 5 minutes of prep time if you use tinned toms. Make a big pot and it will last a few days Hard-boiled egg – keep a stash in the crisper drawer of your fridge Mashed avocado on a slice of wholemeal toast Chopped up veggies with humus – use baby carrots and cherry toms for a chop-free option Natural yogurt w

More veg, please!

When people ask me what is the most important change they can make to improve their diet, I usually answer to increase their intake of vegetables. This might seem daunting, but it doesn't have to take very much time or cost much money to eat more veg. This main course comprises salmon baked with some tamari sauce and sesame seeds. The rest of the plate is filled with a rainbow of vegetables. Broccoli is a cruciferous vegetable. It contains compounds which support the body's detoxification mechanisms and therefore it may be beneficial for people who are exposed to toxins in the environment (which unfortunately, these days, is nearly all of us). Also on the plate are peas - did you know they c

Feeling hormonally challenged?

Many women dread it, some sail through unaffected, others suffer with every symptom, but however you are experiencing the menopause, this special time in your life needs different types of nourishment than you might have needed at other times. Menopause is defined as having one year without any menstrual periods. So, unlike many phases in life, you can only be certain you have experienced it after the fact. With the average age of menopause being 51 years and life expectancy for women high at 82 years, women can expect to spend one third of their life in menopause/post-menopause. Peri-menopausal symptoms are caused by a decrease in the ovaries’ production of the hormones oestrogen and proges

Jam-packed with nutrients!

Jam is high in sugar, right? Not always! I have just discovered a yummy alternative - chia seed jam! Wait! It is not as gross as it sounds! This yummy jam has just two ingredients - strawberries and chia seeds. I used frozen strawberries (which I had defrosted) as fresh ones are not so great at this time if year. For every cup of strawberries you use, you will need 1 tablespoon of chia seeds. So, if you use 2 cups of strawberries, you will need 2 tablespoons of chia. I gently cooked the strawberries for about 10 minutes, mashing them as they warmed. Then I turned the heat off and added a tablespoon of chia seeds, stirring the seeds into the mushy fruit. I left it to cool before pouring into

Boost your soup

People come to see me for a whole range of health issues, but there is one piece of advice that is relevant for most of them, and that is to include more protein in their meals and snacks. This can help to reduce the glycaemic impact of carbohydrate-based meals on blood sugar levels, which may be beneficial in weight loss and might be helpful in supporting thyroid hormones, adrenal health, chronic fatigue, stress and male and female health issues. Protein does not need to be a piece of fish or meat (although it can be!). Protein can also be found in dairy products, poultry, soya, nuts, legumes, eggs and seeds. Here are some easy ways to introduce protein into meals and snacks: 1. Add lentils